I mourn my old life here. We barely scraped by, but I knew where I fit in

2 months ago · via · source · with 705 notes
2 months ago · via · source · with 741 notes
2 months ago · via · source · with 4,899 notes
2 months ago · via · source · with 17,187 notes

cartoonpolitics:

"Homophobia: The fear that another man will treat you like you treat women." ~ (unattributed)

"The key difference between Sherlock and Elementary comes down to the way each show treats its protagonist. Everything in Sherlock revolves around Sherlock. He is the series’ sole reason for existing, and the dynamic remains frozen in amber. Sherlock will do something outrageous, everyone will gasp, but then he’ll solve a crime or offer a token gesture of commiseration, and everyone will move on. It gets old, because the show simultaneously wants its audience to be shocked by Sherlock’s behavior, and charmed by his roguish self-regard and evident brilliance, without much variation. Elementary takes a broader view. As Sherlock, Miller is often standoffish and arrogant, but he exists in a world that refuses to let him off the hook for his mistakes or his behavior; better still, he recognizes his failings, and is clearly working toward addressing them. This doesn’t mean the series is about “fixing” Holmes, or even that the character is inherently broken, but it allows for the possibility of growth and change. On Sherlock, Holmes is constantly bemoaning that he’s surrounded by idiots, and it’s hard to argue his point. On Elementary, Holmes is engaged in the slow, painful process of accepting that those “idiots” might have something to teach him. The former has its moments, but the latter makes for better television and more rewarding art."

It’s Elementary, Sherlock: How the CBS procedural surpassed the BBC drama by Zack Handlen (via wintersoldierofourdiscontent)
2 months ago · via · source · with 6,533 notes

southernish:

theatlantic:

The Grammys’ Big Gay Wedding for Straight Superstars

Congrats to the 33 couples, gay and straight, who walked into the Grammy Awards Sunday night unmarried and walked out as newlyweds. Queen Latifah officiated your wedding; Madonna sang at it; Beyoncé was in the front row—no matter what, that’s an amazing way to kick off a life together.

But the mass marriage that took place to Macklemore’s “Same Love” and Madonna’s “Open Your Heart” towards the end of the night Sunday wasn’t really for the people getting hitched. They were props. It wasn’t really for gay rights either. Any public good that potentially came from the moment—maybe someone at home changing their attitudes about same-sex marriage—were side effects. The main reason for the nuptials, it seemed, was to give the musicians on stage and recording-academy members a chance to announce themselves as good people.

Which, of course, is always the point of everything that happens at Grammys. Like any major awards show, it’s an ad for its industry. This year, the message being sold was, as host LL Cool J dutifully put it at the beginning, that music’s awesomeness transcends all boundaries. Funnily enough, until the ultra-hyped “Same Love” stunt, the ceremony had been doing a pretty good, subtle (if too-slow) job of driving home that message.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

"As more than one person pointed out on Twitter, combined with the Daft Punk win, it’s easy to come away thinking the Grammys likes black music only so long as it’s made by white people.

It’s not a stretch, then, to see the Macklemore and Madonna wedding as an example of the Grammys liking gay people, so long as they’re represented by and intermixed with straight ones. Mary Lambert, who sings the hook on “Same Love,” is lesbian; rumors say that Queen Latifah is too. But Madonna (in a glaring, white, cowboy getup) and Macklemore got the lion’s share of attention. Of course, it’s progress to have same-sex marriages sanctioned on a huge national TV event. But it says something that the real stars of the moment—the people committing to love one another for eternity—were given only a few, fleeting moments on camera. It was their day, but it wasn’t their show.”

2 months ago · via · source · with 2,713 notes

What’s going on down there, Katniss? Have they all joined hands? Taken a vow of nonviolence? Tossed the weapons in the sea in defiance of the Capitol?

2 months ago · via · source · with 12,583 notes

eleventhclara:

2 months ago · via · source · with 9,290 notes

So many people have developed their impressions based on fucking bullshit, and you’ll never do anything true to yourself, you’ll never make the art you want to make, if you’re concerned about that.

2 months ago · via · source · with 913 notes
2 months ago · via · source · with 3,917 notes

neocola:

I NEVER USE ANY STICKERS I GET BECAUSE ITS LIKE OH GOD I CAN ONLY USE THIS STICKER ON ONE THING BEFORE THE STICKINESS IS LOST FOREVER WHAT DO I PUT THIS ON OH NO FUCK LIKE OH MY GOD STICKERS ARE JUST WAY TOO MUCH RESPONSIBILITY FOR ME

thatwetshirt:

the royal tenenbaums + red

2 months ago · via · source · with 2,652 notes
2 months ago · via · source · with 6,219 notes
HW